‘Mutant Chronicles’ Review: Not Great, But Its Got Ron Perlman

Posted in The Screening Room by - February 19, 2015

I have to start off this review by saying that Mutant Chronicles is a piece of shit. It’s an awful example of modern cinema. Unfortunately for the rest of you, I religiously follow the careers of both Ron Perlman and Thomas Jane. Thomas Jane earned my love by starring in the second Punisher movie, along with Deep Blue Sea and The Mist. Meanwhile, Ron Perlman is a classically trained actor with a voice like granite and a face that looks like that same granite was shoved through a wood chipper. Not once have I watched this movie and thought that it held any critical value, but not once have I watched this movie and thought that It was a waste of time.

The plot of Mutant Chronicles is that four corporations, eerily similar to the forces amassed during WWII, are fighting for control of the planet after an unspecified number of years, surviving an unknown apocalypse. These forces, which include Thomas Jane,  uncover a machine that turns humans in to flesh eating mutants. At the same time, Ron Perlman is the senior member of the order of priests that maintain the knowledge of how to stop said machine when man’s folly uncovers it. This pair, along with a few other members of the various military organizations, descend in to the depths of the earth to disable the construct.

The visual aspects of the film are simple and unsurprising. A grey monotone color presides over every scene, obvious, since the film takes place in predominantly urban, snow filled or trench based settings. Rare blossoms of color occur in the robes of Perlman’s priesthood, or in the blood spilled by random soldiers. Bright brown colors help to distinguish the few scenes of hope from the endless bombardment of despair. The soundtrack is surprisingly adept. It fits the tone, with a religious overtone of chanting and harsh percussion that assists in portraying the devastating and fruitless ambiance of the film.

The supporting actors are of a surprising collection. John Malkovich portrays Perlman’s superior, fated to die on the earth without chance of evacuation. His halting speech exemplifies the regretful man of religion, destined to die at the hands of fate. Sean Pertwee, known best as Sgt. Harry G. Wells from Dog Soldiers, plays a pivotal role as Jane’s superior officer. 

Again, I have to admit that the film is not one I would suggest to the casual film-goer. I find it entertaining and commendable, but I have spent many a year following the career and the development of independent horror film actors and actresses. The film has a few moments in which the characters are relatable and sympathetic, as well as moments in which they seem truly empathetic. There are even a few lines of dialogue in which I would point out the humorous and very humane aspects of the conversations. Unfortunately, the overall plot points of the film force the characters to behave in off putting and unsettling manners.

If you’re a sci-fi buff with the ability to look past the over all poorly designed aesthetics of the movie, than by all means spend your time watching it. I find the movie quite enjoyable, thanks to my intense love of both Perlman and Jane. However, the overall plot is rather simple and predictable, and the special effects are sub par, forcing me to rate the film as a poor choice, unless you meet the same specific requirements as myself.

Final Say: Skip It (Unless you really love Thomas Jane or Ron Perlman)

 

This post was written by

Born in Arizona, he currently resides in Denton, Texas. When he isn’t watching movies he’s playing board games and drinking whatever he can get his hands on. John watches Djimon Honsou movies because he likes Spawn, which had Michael Jai White.

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