“Why would I need a car?”: ‘Doc Hollywood’ Review

Screening Room ‐ February 22, 2018
“Why would I need a car?”: ‘Doc Hollywood’ Review

Doc Hollywood is more than just your average “fish out of water” story it’s also a thoroughly entertaining and charming romantic comedy that has Michael J. Fox in one of his most fun performances. Director Michael Caton-Jones manages to have a delightful blend of romantic comedy with coming of age and beautifully punctuate it with this beating heart that the film has as a whole; it’s so full of charming Americana iconography.

The story follows Ben (Michael J. Fox), a young surgeon, who is excited about starting a new life in Beverly Hills but all that changes when an accident leaves …

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A Rareware Platformer For The Tired, Tired Millennials: Poi: Explorer Edition Review

Kulturecade ‐ February 22, 2018
A Rareware Platformer For The Tired, Tired Millennials: Poi: Explorer Edition Review

So we’re just under a year into the life of the Nintendo Switch and while at first glance, it may seem that some titles have caused the system to flirt with that dangerous realm of shovelware and predatory pricing (looking at you, RBI Baseball 2017, $50 at release my ass), Nintendo has successfully staved off the dumping ground status that has plagued its most successful systems in the eyes of the “hardcore” gaming crowd. This is, for one thing, because casual fodder like Just Dance and Skylanders have become no more synonymous with the Switch as they have for the …

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The Immortal Genre: How Black Panther’s Success Defies Industry Expectations

Screening Room ‐ February 19, 2018
The Immortal Genre: How Black Panther’s Success Defies Industry Expectations

Perhaps the most interesting question in today’s franchise-ruled box office environment is “Where do we go from superhero movies?” That, however, implies that superhero films may one day end. That there may come a summer movie season that isn’t populated by dozens of action blockbusters that, although star different actors, are helmed by different directors, and produced by any variety of different companies, are still, at their storyline center, essentially the same film. It’s difficult to imagine a day when we won’t be hotly anticipating the next X-Men, Marvel, or (perhaps not so hotly) DC film. But genres have lifecycles, …

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“I am the husband!”: ‘Green Card’ Review

Screening Room ‐ February 19, 2018
“I am the husband!”: ‘Green Card’ Review

Peter Weir, celebrated director of Picnic at Hanging Rock and Master and Commander, is not really the first name when one thinks of for the romantic comedy genre but yet his entry into that genre is actually a charming experience.

Its story centers on two people Georges (Gerard Depardieu) and Bronte (Andie MacDowell) as they decide to get married for convenience so that Georges can obtain a green card to live in the United States. But as they get more involved in their complicated relationship the bond between the two of them begins to change and grow. What starts out as …

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Who Does Star Wars Belong To?

Screening Room ‐ February 19, 2018

There is a war on for Star Wars. Star Wars Episode VIII: The Last Jedi has premiered to mixed responses from audiences. One of the most anticipated movies of the year, the newest entry in one of the biggest franchises of all time, is facing an odd response from fans, who are sharply divided on their opinions of the film. How did we get here? Well, there’s a number of factors to take into consideration, and to understand what split the fandom this harshly, you need a better understanding of the history of Star Wars, its relationship with fans, and …

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Death, Spare Me Over: What Remains of Edith Finch Review

Kulturecade ‐ February 16, 2018
Death, Spare Me Over: What Remains of Edith Finch Review

I had so many questions once I finished What Remains of Edith Finch, but so as not to get super into the story of it and spoil the game in this first sentence, I’ll stick with this one: if a game scares you, does that inherently make it a horror game? As a “walking-simulator” type game with a self-described “Lovecraftian” story, Edith Finch is the type of game that cranks your anxiety meter up to high gear as you explore the abandoned Finch house with its many sealed doors and hidden passageways, constantly bracing yourself for the inevitable jump-scare or …

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Breakfast at Tiffany’s

Kulturecast ‐ February 12, 2018
Breakfast at Tiffany’s

Chris and Eric kick off Rom-Com Month with a look at one of the classics Breakfast at Tiffany’s. The film stars Audrey Hepburn as Holly Golightly, a New Yorker with her sights set on the big time who meets the man of her dreams in her apartment building. It’s a film that hasn’t aged well and is full of anachronisms including an astoundingly racist Mickey Rooney.

As always, you can follow Chris Stachiw at @KultureStach, Eric Kniss at @tychomagnetics and Kulture Shocked at @KultureShocked. The music is Wovoka’s “Lament,” and Da DeCypher’s “Two Step featuring Ben-Jamin”; big thanks to both for allowing us to use their tracks. …

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The History of the Yuke’s Wrestling Engine, Part 2: Laying the Foundations of SmackDown!

Kulturecade ‐ February 08, 2018

If 1999 was the year that the WWF really pulled away from its competition in WCW, with defections like Chris Jericho and former Giant, The Big Show, as the most effective signals that the tide had turned, then 2000 was nothing but cake for Vinnie Mac and company. A great year highlighted by a continued trend of mass defection from the likes of The Radicalz and William Regal, plus consistently solid PPV offerings, a smaller but vital piece of the puzzle as far as monetary success would be further improvement in their video game offerings. Enter the young upstart wrestling …

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A Broken World: Fallen: A2P Protocol

Kulturecade ‐ February 07, 2018
A Broken World: Fallen: A2P Protocol

Fallen: A2P Protocol is a turn-based strategy game set in a post-apocalyptic future. It tells a tale of revenge as a group of travelers do battle with murderers and thieves across an arid wasteland. The world presented in the game is bleak, devoid of any trace of sheen or care. Coincidentally, the game itself really isn’t so different.

The game puts players in the shoes of Herk West, a wanderer who is sold into slavery by his brother before being liberated about 30 seconds later. From that point on, players will lead Herk on a quest to kill his brother, gathering …

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“I haven’t lived.  I’ve died a few times”: ‘Harold and Maude’ Review

Screening Room ‐ February 07, 2018
“I haven’t lived.  I’ve died a few times”: ‘Harold and Maude’ Review

What better way to start our celebration of love stories than with a delightful May/December romance that just happens to be one of the cornerstones of 1970s counterculture filmmaking. Hal Ashby’s Harold and Maude is a joyous, stylish and subversive celebration of life, love, joy, sadness, and expression that is a wonder to behold from start to finish.  Directed by one of the heavyweights of the New Hollywood, Hal Ashby, and written by Colin Higgins Harold and Maude does a spectacular job at deftly combining sub-genres into its romantic comedy premise.

The story concerns Harold, a young man near his 20s, …

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